Peeling back the evolutionary layers of molecular mechanisms responsive to exercise-stress in the skeletal muscle of the racing horse

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Title
Peeling back the evolutionary layers of molecular mechanisms responsive to exercise-stress in the skeletal muscle of the racing horse
Author(s)
H Kim; T Lee; W Park; J W Lee; J Kim; B Y Lee; H Ahn; S Moon; S Cho; K T Do; H S Kim; H K Lee; C K Lee; H S Kong; Y M Yang; J Park; H M Kim; M C Kim; Seungwoo Hwang; J Bhak; D Burt; K D Park; B W Cho; H Kim
Bibliographic Citation
DNA Research, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 287-298
Publication Year
2013
Abstract
The modern horse (Equus caballus) is the product of over 50 million yrs of evolution. The athletic abilities of the horse have been enhanced during the past 6000 yrs under domestication. Therefore, the horse serves as a valuable model to understand the physiology and molecular mechanisms of adaptive responses to exercise. The structure and function of skeletal muscle show remarkable plasticity to the physical and metabolic challenges following exercise. Here, we reveal an evolutionary layer of responsiveness to exercise-stress in the skeletal muscle of the racing horse. We analysed differentially expressed genes and their co-expression networks in a large-scale RNA-sequence dataset comparing expression before and after exercise. By estimating genome-wide dN/dS ratios using six mammalian genomes, and FST and iHS using re-sequencing data derived from 20 horses, we were able to peel back the evolutionary layers of adaptations to exercise-stress in the horse. We found that the oldest and thickest layer (dN/dS) consists of system-wide tissue and organ adaptations. We further find that, during the period of horse domestication, the older layer (FST) is mainly responsible for adaptations to inflammation and energy metabolism, and the most recent layer (iHS) for neurological system process, cell adhesion, and proteolysis.
Keyword
EvolutionExerciseHorseRe-sequencingRNA sequencing
ISSN
1340-2838
Publisher
Oxford Univ Press
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/dnares/dst010
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Articles > Journal Articles
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