Enhancing microalgal biomass productivity by engineering a microalgal-bacterial community

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dc.contributor.authorDae Hyun Cho-
dc.contributor.authorR Ramanan-
dc.contributor.authorJina Heo-
dc.contributor.authorJimin Lee-
dc.contributor.authorByung-Hyuk Kim-
dc.contributor.authorHee-Mock Oh-
dc.contributor.authorHee-Sik Kim-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T10:00:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-19T10:00:21Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.issn09608524-
dc.identifier.uri10.1016/j.biortech.2014.10.159ko
dc.identifier.urihttps://oak.kribb.re.kr/handle/201005/12350-
dc.description.abstractThis study demonstrates that ecologically engineered bacterial consortium could enhance microalgal biomass and lipid productivities through carbon exchange. Phycosphere bacterial diversity analysis in xenic Chlorella vulgaris (XCV) confirmed the presence of growth enhancing and inhibiting microorganisms. Co-cultivation of axenic C. vulgaris (ACV) with four different growth enhancing bacteria revealed a symbiotic relationship with each bacterium. An artificial microalgal-bacterial consortium (AMBC) constituting these four bacteria and ACV showed that the bacterial consortium exerted a statistically significant (P<. 0.05) growth enhancement on ACV. Moreover, AMBC had superior flocculation efficiency, lipid content and quality. Studies on carbon exchange revealed that bacteria in AMBC might utilize fixed organic carbon released by microalgae, and in return, supply inorganic and low molecular weight (LMW) organic carbon influencing algal growth and metabolism. Such exchanges, although species specific, have enormous significance in carbon cycle and can be exploitated by microalgal biotechnology industry.-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.titleEnhancing microalgal biomass productivity by engineering a microalgal-bacterial community-
dc.title.alternativeEnhancing microalgal biomass productivity by engineering a microalgal-bacterial community-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.citation.titleBioresource Technology-
dc.citation.number0-
dc.citation.endPage585-
dc.citation.startPage578-
dc.citation.volume175C-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorDae Hyun Cho-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorHee-Mock Oh-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorHee-Sik Kim-
dc.contributor.alternativeName조대현-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameRamanan-
dc.contributor.alternativeName허진아-
dc.contributor.alternativeName이지민-
dc.contributor.alternativeName김병혁-
dc.contributor.alternativeName오희목-
dc.contributor.alternativeName김희식-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioresource Technology, vol. 175C, pp. 578-585-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biortech.2014.10.159-
dc.subject.keywordArtificial microalgal bacterial community-
dc.subject.keywordBiodiesel-
dc.subject.keywordChlorella vulgaris-
dc.subject.keywordGrowth enhancement-
dc.subject.keywordPhycosphere bacteria-
dc.subject.localArtificial microalgal bacterial community-
dc.subject.localBiodiesel-
dc.subject.localChlorella vulgaris-
dc.subject.localGrowth enhancement-
dc.subject.localPhycosphere bacteria-
dc.description.journalClassY-
Appears in Collections:
Division of Biomaterials Research > Cell Factory Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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