Orphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression

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dc.contributor.authorY Zhang-
dc.contributor.authorD K Kim-
dc.contributor.authorJ M Lee-
dc.contributor.authorS B Park-
dc.contributor.authorW I Jeong-
dc.contributor.authorS H Kim-
dc.contributor.authorI K Lee-
dc.contributor.authorChul Ho Lee-
dc.contributor.authorJ Y L Chiang-
dc.contributor.authorH S Choi-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T10:10:39Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-19T10:10:39Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.issn02646021-
dc.identifier.uri10.1042/BJ20141494ko
dc.identifier.urihttps://oak.kribb.re.kr/handle/201005/12811-
dc.description.abstractBile acids are primarily synthesized from cholesterol in the liver and have important roles in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homoeostasis. Detailed roles of the orphan nuclear receptors regulating cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), the rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis, have not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we report that oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ ) is a novel transcriptional regulator of CYP7A1 expression. Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 receptor) signalling induced ERRγ -mediated transcription of the CYP7A1 gene. Overexpression of ERRγ increased CYP7A1 expression in vitro and in vivo, whereas knockdown of ERRγ attenuated CYP7A1 expression. Deletion analysis of the CYP7A1 gene promoter and a ChIP assay revealed an ERRγ -binding site on the CYP7A1 gene promoter. Small heterodimer partner (SHP) inhibited the transcriptional activity of ERRγ and thus regulated CYP7A1 expression. Overexpression of ERRγ led to increased bile acid levels, whereas an inverse agonist of ERRγ , GSK5182, reduced CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis. Finally, GSK5182 significantly reduced hepatic CB1 receptormediated induction of CYP7A1 expression and bile acid synthesis in alcohol-treated mice. These results provide the molecular mechanism linking ERRγ and bile acid metabolism.-
dc.publisherPortland Press Ltd-
dc.titleOrphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression-
dc.title.alternativeOrphan nuclear receptor oestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ) plays a key role in hepatic cannabinoid receptor type 1-mediated induction of CYP7A1 gene expression-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.citation.titleBiochemical Journal-
dc.citation.number2-
dc.citation.endPage193-
dc.citation.startPage181-
dc.citation.volume470-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorChul Ho Lee-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameZhang-
dc.contributor.alternativeName김돈규-
dc.contributor.alternativeName이지민-
dc.contributor.alternativeName박승범-
dc.contributor.alternativeName정원일-
dc.contributor.alternativeName김승현-
dc.contributor.alternativeName이인규-
dc.contributor.alternativeName이철호-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameChiang-
dc.contributor.alternativeName최흥식-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBiochemical Journal, vol. 470, no. 2, pp. 181-193-
dc.identifier.doi10.1042/BJ20141494-
dc.subject.keywordBile acid-
dc.subject.keywordCannabinoid receptors-
dc.subject.keywordCholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1)-
dc.subject.keywordGSK5182-
dc.subject.keywordOestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ )-
dc.subject.keywordOrphan nuclear receptor-
dc.subject.keywordSmall heterodimer partner (SHP)-
dc.subject.localBile acid-
dc.subject.localCannabinoid receptors-
dc.subject.localCannabinoid receptor-
dc.subject.localCholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1)-
dc.subject.localGSK5182-
dc.subject.localOestrogen-related receptor γ (ERRγ )-
dc.subject.localOrphan nuclear receptor-
dc.subject.localSmall heterodimer partner (SHP)-
dc.description.journalClassY-
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Ochang Branch Institute > Division of Bioinfrastructure > Laboratory Animal Resource Center > 1. Journal Articles
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