Insect stings to change gear for healthy plant: Improving maize drought tolerance by whitefly infestation

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dc.contributor.authorY S Park-
dc.contributor.authorChoong-Min Ryu-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T10:22:58Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-19T10:22:58Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.issn15592316-
dc.identifier.uri10.1080/15592324.2016.1179420.ko
dc.identifier.urihttps://oak.kribb.re.kr/handle/201005/13298-
dc.description.abstractSince plants first appeared about 1.1 billion years ago, they have been faced with biotic and abiotic stresses in their environment. To overcome these stresses, plants developed defense strategies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Genn.)] affects the regulation of plant defenses and physiology. A recent study demonstrates that aboveground whitefly infestation positively modulates root biomass and anthocyanin pigmentation on brace roots of maize plants (Zea mays L.). In agreement with these observations, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and jasmonic acid (JA) contents and the expression of IAA- and JA-related genes are higher in whitefly-infested maize plants than in non-infected control plants. Interestingly, the fresh weight of whitefly-infested maize plants is approximately 20% higher than in non-infected control plants under water stress conditions. Further investigation has revealed that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulates in whitefly-infested maize plants after water stoppage. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of phytohormones- (i.e., IAA and JA) and H2O2-mediated maize signaling pathways triggered by aboveground whitefly infestation promotes drought resistance. They also provide an insight into how inter-kingdom interactions can improve drought tolerance in plants.-
dc.publisherT&F (Taylor & Francis)-
dc.titleInsect stings to change gear for healthy plant: Improving maize drought tolerance by whitefly infestation-
dc.title.alternativeInsect stings to change gear for healthy plant: Improving maize drought tolerance by whitefly infestation-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.citation.titlePlant Signaling & Behavior-
dc.citation.number5-
dc.citation.endPagee1179420-
dc.citation.startPagee1179420-
dc.citation.volume11-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorChoong-Min Ryu-
dc.contributor.alternativeName박용순-
dc.contributor.alternativeName류충민-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationPlant Signaling & Behavior, vol. 11, no. 5, pp. e1179420-e1179420-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15592324.2016.1179420.-
dc.subject.keywordAnthocyanin-
dc.subject.keyworddrought tolerance-
dc.subject.keywordhydrogen peroxide-
dc.subject.keywordIAA-
dc.subject.keywordjasmonic acid-
dc.subject.keywordmaize-
dc.subject.keywordwhitefly-
dc.subject.localAnthocyanin-
dc.subject.localdrought tolerance-
dc.subject.localDrought tolerance-
dc.subject.localhydrogen peroxide-
dc.subject.localHydrogen peroxide-
dc.subject.localIAA-
dc.subject.localjasmonic acid-
dc.subject.localJasmonic acid-
dc.subject.localmaize-
dc.subject.localMaize-
dc.subject.localwhitefly-
dc.subject.localWhitefly-
dc.description.journalClassY-
Appears in Collections:
Division of Research on National Challenges > Infectious Disease Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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