Antennal sensillum morphology and electrophysiological responses of olfactory receptor neurons in trichoid sensilla of the diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)

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Title
Antennal sensillum morphology and electrophysiological responses of olfactory receptor neurons in trichoid sensilla of the diamondback moth (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)
Author(s)
S L Wee; Hyun Woo Oh; K C Park
Bibliographic Citation
Florida Entomologist, vol. 99, pp. 146-158
Publication Year
2016
Abstract
Plant chemical signals are important olfactory cues for the survival and reproduction of phytophagous insects. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is a Brassica spp. (Brassicales: Brassicaceae) specialist pest, with most of its life events occurring on Brassica spp. hosts. We conducted a scanning electron microscopy study on the morphology and distribution of antennal sensilla of male and female P. xylostella. Seven morphological types of sensilla were identified in the antennae of P. xylostella: 3 types of sensilla trichodea (Tr I, Tr II and Tr III), sensilla chaetica, sensilla coeloconica, sensilla auricillica and sensilla styloconica. One particular type of trichoid sensillum (Tr III) was present only in the males. The presence of numerous pores or deep longitudinal grooves on the surfaces of 5 morphological types of sensilla indicated that their major function is olfactory. Single sensillum recordings were also carried out on the trichoid sensilla of the female diamondback moth to identify the olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and to determine the response spectra of the ORNs, using a panel of 39 host and non-host volatile compounds. Based on the response profiles, 42 responsive trichoid sensilla could be segregated into 4 sensillum classes. Each sensillum appeared to contain 3 co-compartmentalized ORNs, and therefore a total of 12 classes of ORNs were identified from these sensilla. Each ORN class showed a narrow response spectrum, with some ORNs specialized for green leaf volatiles and (±)-linalool that are present in brassicaceous hosts, while several other ORNs responded to 2 non-host volatile sesquiterpenes, (E)-β-farnesene and germacrene D, as well as (E)-β-caryophyllene, a host-related sesquiterpene volatile. The sensitivity and selectivity of the female diamondback moth towards certain host plant volatiles warrants further investigation for potential behavioral manipulation to control this pest
Keyword
OlfactionPlutella xylostellaScanning electron microscopySingle sensillum recordingTrichodeaVolatile compounds
ISSN
0015-4040
Publisher
Florida Entomological Soc
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1653/024.099.sp118
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Division of Bio Technology Innovation > Core Facility Management Center > 1. Journal Articles
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