Use of microfluidic technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of human ESC-derived neural cells

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Title
Use of microfluidic technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of human ESC-derived neural cells
Author(s)
J Bae; N Lee; W Choi; S Lee; J J Ko; Baek Soo HanSang Chul Lee; N L Jeon; J Song
Bibliographic Citation
Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1502, pp. 223-235
Publication Year
2016
Abstract
Microfluidics forms the basis of unique experimental approaches that visualize the development of neural structure using micro-scale devices and aids the guidance of neurite growth in an axonal isolation compartment. We utilized microfluidics technology to monitor the differentiation and migration of neural cells derived from human embryonic stems cells (hESC). We cocultured hESC with PA6 stromal cells and isolated neural rosette-like structures, which subsequently formed neurospheres in a suspension culture. We found that Tuj1-positive neural cells but not nestin-positive neural precursor cells (NPC) were able to enter the microfluidics grooves (microchannels), suggesting a neural cell-migratory capacity that was dependent on neuronal differentiation. We also showed that bundles of axons formed and extended into the microchannels. Taken together, these results demonstrated that microfluidics technology can provide useful tools to study neurite outgrowth and axon guidance of neural cells, which are derived from human embryonic stem cells.
Keyword
Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs)Mature neuronsMicrofluidic devicesNeural differentiationNeural precursor cells (NPCs)Neurite outgrowth
ISSN
1064-3745
Publisher
Humana Press
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/7651_2016_337
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Division of Research on National Challenges > Biodefense Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
Division of Biomedical Research > Metabolic Regulation Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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