Native high-density lipoproteins (HDL) with higher paraoxonase exerts a potent antiviral effect against SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), while glycated HDL lost the antiviral activity

Cited 15 time in scopus
Metadata Downloads
Title
Native high-density lipoproteins (HDL) with higher paraoxonase exerts a potent antiviral effect against SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19), while glycated HDL lost the antiviral activity
Author(s)
K H Cho; J R Kim; In Chul LeeHyung-Jun Kwon
Bibliographic Citation
Antioxidants, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 209-209
Publication Year
2021
Abstract
Human high-density lipoproteins (HDL) show a broad spectrum of antiviral activity in terms of anti-infection. Although many reports have pointed out a correlation between a lower serum HDL-C and a higher risk of COVID-19 infection and progression, the in vitro antiviral activity of HDL against SARS-CoV-2 has not been reported. HDL functionality, such as antioxidant and anti-infection, can be impaired by oxidation and glycation and a change to pro-inflammatory properties. This study compared the antiviral activity of native HDL with glycated HDL via fructosylation and native low-density lipoproteins (LDL). After 72 h of fructosylation, glycated HDL showed a typical multimerized protein pattern with an elevation of yellowish fluorescence. Glycated HDL showed a smaller particle size with an ambiguous shape and a loss of paraoxonase activity up to 51% compared to native HDL. The phagocytosis of acetylated LDL was accelerated 1.3-fold by glycated HDL than native HDL. Native HDL showed 1.7 times higher cell viability and 3.6 times higher cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibition activity against SARS-CoV-2 than that of glycated HDL under 60 μg/mL (approximately final 2.2 μM) in a Vero E6 cell. Native HDL showed EC50 = 52.1 ± 1.1 μg/mL (approximately final 1.8 μM) for the CPE and CC50 = 79.4 ± 1.5 μg/mL (around 2.8 μM). The selective index (SI) of native HDL was calculated to be 1.52. In conclusion, native HDL shows potent antiviral activity against SARS-CoV-2 without cytotoxicity, while the glycation of HDL impairs its antiviral activity. These results may explain why patients with diabetes mellitus or hypertension are more sensitive to a COVID-19 infection and have a higher risk of mortality.
Keyword
COVID-19SARS-CoV-2High-density lipoproteins (HDL)GlycationParaoxonaseLowdensity lipoproteins
ISSN
2076-3921
Publisher
MDPI
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/antiox10020209
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Jeonbuk Branch Institute > Functional Biomaterial Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
Files in This Item:
  • There are no files associated with this item.


Items in OpenAccess@KRIBB are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.