Retinol binding protein 7 promotes adipogenesis in vitro and regulates expression of genes involved in retinol metabolism

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Title
Retinol binding protein 7 promotes adipogenesis in vitro and regulates expression of genes involved in retinol metabolism
Author(s)
Dong-Hwan Kim; J Ahn; Y Suh; O Ziouzenkova; Jeong Woong Lee; K Lee
Bibliographic Citation
Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, vol. 10, pp. 876031-876031
Publication Year
2022
Abstract
Retinol is an essential nutrient in animals. Its metabolites, specifically retinoic acid (RA), are crucial for cell differentiation, including adipogenesis. Retinol binding protein 7 (Rbp7) is under the control of PPARγ, the master regulator of adipogenesis. However, the role of RBP7 in adipogenesis is unclear. Our study showed that Rbp7 was abundantly expressed in white and brown mouse adipose tissues and had a higher expression in adipocytes than in stromal vascular fraction. Rbp7 overexpression promoted 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation with increased triglyceride accumulation and up-regulation of Pparγ, Fabp4, C/ebpα, and AdipoQ. Rbp7 deficient adipocytes had opposite effects of the overexpression, which were rescued by RA supplementation. Indirect assessment of relative nuclear RA levels using RAR response element (RARE)-Luc reporter assay demonstrated that Rbp7 overexpression significantly increased RARE-Luc reporter activity. Rbp7 overexpression significantly increased expression of Raldh1, responsible for RA production, and up-regulation of Lrat and Cyp26a1, involved in retinol storage and RA catabolism, respectively, in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Rbp7 deficient adipocytes had opposite effects of the overexpression of those genes involved in retinol metabolism. These data suggest that RBP7 increases transcriptional activity of RARE that may induce negative feedback responses via regulation of the gene expression for retinol homeostasis. Our data indicate critical RBP7 functions in adipocytes: regulation of transcriptional activity of RARE and adipocytes differentiation, potentially providing a new target for obesity therapy.
Keyword
Vitamin ABinding proteinsAdipogenesisRetinoid metabolismLipid metabolism
ISSN
2296-634X
Publisher
Frontiers Media Sa
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2022.876031
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Division of Biomedical Research > Biotherapeutics Translational Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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