A possible mechanism responsible for translocation and secretion of an alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. S-1 pullulanase

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Title
A possible mechanism responsible for translocation and secretion of an alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. S-1 pullulanase
Author(s)
Jae Kyoung Shim; Kyung Sook Kim; Cheorl Ho Kim
Bibliographic Citation
Journal of Microbiology, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 213-221
Publication Year
1997
Abstract
The secretion of the alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. S-1 extracellular pullulanase involves translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane of the Gram-positive bacterial cell envelope. Translocation of the intracellular pullulanase PUL-I, was traced to elucidate the mechanism and pathway of protein secretion from an alkaliphilic Bacillus sp. S-1. Pullulanase could be slowly but quantitatively released into the medium during growth of the cells in medium containing proteinase K. The released pullulanase lacked the N-terminal domain. The N-terminus is the sole membrane anchor in the pullulanase protein and was not affected by proteases, confirming that it is not exposed on the cell surface. Processing of a 180,000 Mr pullulanase to a 140,000 Mr polypeptide has been demonstrated in cell extracts using antibodies raised against 140,000 Mr extracellular form. Processing of the 180,000 Mr protein occured during the preparation of extracts in an alkaline pH condition. A modified rapid extraction procedure suggested that the processing event also occured in vivo. Processing apparently increased the activity of pullulanase. The western blotting analysis with mouse anti-serum against 140-kDa extracellular pullulanase PUL-E showed that PUL-I is processed into PUL-X via intermediate form of PUL-E. Possible explanations for the translocation are discussed.
Keyword
alkaliphilic bacillus sp. S-1intracellular pullulanasesecretiontranslocation
ISSN
1225-8873
Publisher
Microbiological Society Korea
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
1. Journal Articles > Journal Articles
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