Antizyme suppression leads to an increment of the cellular redox potential and an induction of HIF-1 alpha: Its involvement in resistance to gamma-radiation

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Title
Antizyme suppression leads to an increment of the cellular redox potential and an induction of HIF-1 alpha: Its involvement in resistance to gamma-radiation
Author(s)
J S Kim; T L Kim; Eun Wie Cho; S G Paik; H W Chung; I G Kim
Bibliographic Citation
IUBMB Life, vol. 60, no. 6, pp. 402-409
Publication Year
2008
Abstract
The mammalian antizyme (AZ) promotes ubiqutin-independent degradation of ornithine decarboxylase, a key enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis. This study shows that AZ suppression in human lung carcinoma A549 cells caused growth defects and death, but made the cells resistant to DNA damaging agents such as gamma-radiation and cisplatin. In these cells, the cellular redox potential (glutathione/glutathione disulfide [GSH/GSSG] ratio) was increased and thus intracellular reactive oxygen species were severely diminished, which might cause growth defects and cell death. The increase of cellular redox potential was mainly caused by dramatic increase of the cytoplasmic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP)(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase, which generates the reducing equivalents NADPH. In the AZ-suppressed cells, the hypoxia inducible factor 1alpha (HIF-1alpha) was also increased. As in other cases which showed an increment of HIF-1alpha and the cellular redox potential, the AZ-suppressed cells showed resistance to gamma-radiation and anticancer drugs. Therefore, these facts might be considered as important for the use of radio- and chemotherapy on tumor cells which show an unbalance in their polyamine levels.
Keyword
γ-radiationAntizymeCellular redox potentialCytoplasmic NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (cICDH)Hypoxia inducible factor-1αReactive oxygen species
ISSN
1521-6543
Publisher
Wiley
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/iub.49
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Division of Biomedical Research > Rare Disease Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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