Rhizosphere bacteria help plants tolerate abiotic stress

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dc.contributor.authorJungwook Yang-
dc.contributor.authorJ W Kloepper-
dc.contributor.authorChoong-Min Ryu-
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-19T09:13:10Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-19T09:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.issn13601385-
dc.identifier.uri10.1016/j.tplants.2008.10.004ko
dc.identifier.urihttps://oak.kribb.re.kr/handle/201005/8819-
dc.description.abstractPlant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are associated with plant roots and augment plant productivity and immunity; however, recent work by several groups shows that PGPR also elicit so-called 'induced systemic tolerance' to salt and drought. As we discuss here, PGPR might also increase nutrient uptake from soils, thus reducing the need for fertilizers and preventing the accumulation of nitrates and phosphates in agricultural soils. A reduction in fertilizer use would lessen the effects of water contamination from fertilizer run-off and lead to savings for farmers.-
dc.publisherElsevier-
dc.titleRhizosphere bacteria help plants tolerate abiotic stress-
dc.title.alternativeRhizosphere bacteria help plants tolerate abiotic stress-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.citation.titleTrends in Plant Science-
dc.citation.number1-
dc.citation.endPage4-
dc.citation.startPage1-
dc.citation.volume14-
dc.contributor.affiliatedAuthorChoong-Min Ryu-
dc.contributor.alternativeName양정욱-
dc.contributor.alternativeNameKloepper-
dc.contributor.alternativeName류충민-
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTrends in Plant Science, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 1-4-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tplants.2008.10.004-
dc.description.journalClassY-
Appears in Collections:
Division of Research on National Challenges > Infectious Disease Research Center > 1. Journal Articles
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