Transient secondary structures as general target-binding motifs in intrinsically disordered proteins

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Title
Transient secondary structures as general target-binding motifs in intrinsically disordered proteins
Author(s)
Do-Hyoung Kim; Kyou Hoon Han
Bibliographic Citation
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, vol. 19, no. 11, pp. 3614-3614
Publication Year
2018
Abstract
Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are unorthodox proteins that do not form three-dimensional structures under non-denaturing conditions, but perform important biological functions. In addition, IDPs are associated with many critical diseases including cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and viral diseases. Due to the generic name of "unstructured" proteins used for IDPs in the early days, the notion that IDPs would be completely unstructured down to the level of secondary structures has prevailed for a long time. During the last two decades, ample evidence has been accumulated showing that IDPs in their target-free state are pre-populated with transient secondary structures critical for target binding. Nevertheless, such a message did not seem to have reached with sufficient clarity to the IDP or protein science community largely because similar but different expressions were used to denote the fundamentally same phenomenon of presence of such transient secondary structures, which is not surprising for a quickly evolving field. Here, we summarize the critical roles that these transient secondary structures play for diverse functions of IDPs by describing how various expressions referring to transient secondary structures have been used in different contexts.
Keyword
intrinsically disordered protein (IDP)pre-populatedpre-structuredtransient secondary structure
ISSN
1422-0067
Publisher
MDPI
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms19113614
Type
Article
Appears in Collections:
Division of Bio Technology Innovation > Core Research Facility & Analysis Center > 1. Journal Articles
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